How Do Pharmaceutical Drugs Get in Drinking Water? The Answer is Here

How do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water? Did this question cross your mind after the recent release of an AP investigative report on the subject?

Before the story, I never thought about what was in the water that I was drinking. I felt safe. The only time I ever worried about the water that I drinking was when we had a severe storm and a boil water order was issued.

But, after seeing that headline flash on the TV screen, I knew I needed to know more. Just like you I asked myself the question, “How do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water?”

Then I thought about it for a minute. I thought about all the places that drugs are found starting with the labs that create the drugs. From there, the pharmaceuticals reach hospitals, clinics, doctors’ offices, pharmacies, patients, veterinarians, farmers and the list goes on. I thought about how they get from one place to another. They are transported by boat, plane, car, truck, and mail carrier. And finally I thought about the billions of people who use pharmaceuticals everyday. It didn’t take me very long to realize the answer to my question, “How do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water?” The answer is a simple one. We put them there.

Drug recalls, expired drugs, defective drugs all have to go somewhere. They end up in landfills or flushed down the drain. We do it in our homes. If we have expired or left over medicine, what do we do with it? We put it in the trash; rinse it down the drain or flush it down the toilet. No matter which method is chosen the drugs eventually end up in the water It really is a wonder that we don’t read more articles with the headline: probe finds drugs in drinking water.

But, answering the question, “How do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water?” wasn’t enough for me. I wanted to know how I could protect my family.

I ran out and bought a case of bottled water But, then I discovered that the water that I had bought was tap water in a bottle. In fact, I discovered that most bottled water is tap water This definitely wasn’t the right choice.

I didn’t want to have to worry ever again if I read: “Probe Finds Drugs in Drinking Water” in my local newspaper. So I checked out getting a water filtration system for my home.

There were a lot of different water filtration methods available. I found distillers, reverse osmosis systems, carbon-ion systems etc.; but which one was right for me?

I checked them out and discovered that the carbon-ion filtration method did the best job when it comes to making sure that the drugs found in our drinking water will not reach my children’s lips.

The carbon-ion filtration method is twofold. First the thick carbon block filters the water so any bacteria, chemical, or other sediment is trapped. The ion exchange acts to render the drugs and other chemicals found in water inert.

I found out through my research that I don’t really need to know the answer to the question: “how do pharmaceutical drugs get in drinking water?”. Or have to worry about headlines that read; “probe finds drugs in drinking water ” I just have to sit back and let my carbon-ion filtration work for me.

For more information on the importance of water filters, visit Water Is Health.

Cheap Medicines Online – Is it Worth It To Buy Them?

Healthcare inflation has led many people to patronize cheaper drugs. The cheapest substitute to branded medicines is generic drugs. If the doctor recommends a specific branded medicine, one can request for a generic drug with the same effect. Generic drugs are grouped under over-the-counter (OTC) and prescription pill categories. The Congressional Budget Office of the United States reports that consumers saved $8 to $ 10 billion every year by buying generic drugs.

Unlike the manufacturers of branded medicines, generic drug pharmaceuticals do not spend for for development and research. Roughly $32 billion is the cost of developing new drugs, as reported by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America. The average cost to develop one drug is $897 million, according to the Boston’s Tufts Center for the Study of Drug Development. These figures explain why new branded drugs are very expensive.

Generic drugs are more inexpensive because they no money is spent on research and development. The generic medicines are created upon the expiry of a branded drug’s patent. The patent’s expiry lets numerous pharmaceutical companies to produce and sell a generic version. As the competition increases, lower-priced drugs sell more. Although the prices are lower, the generics must use the same active ingredients as the branded counterpart. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is tasked to make sure that all generic drugs meet their standards.

Generic medicines are available at online pharmacies. These pharmacy sites offer inexpensive quality medicines. However, buying medicines online comes with many risks. Some of these websites are fraudulent sites that do not deliver quality-control medicines. Most of these companies are not even recognized by the US FDA, resulting in customers consuming unsafe drugs from unauthorized pharmacies.

It is imperative to scrutinize the pharmacies selling cheap medicine online. Although these online drugstores offer prices lower than local pharmacies, it is more important to ensure that the products are secure for consumption. It It is more costly to visit a doctor in order to be cured from a fake medicine’s side effects than purchasing more costly but more effective and less harmful drugs from reputable pharmacies.

Opting to buy cheap medicines online comes with its pros and cons. In order to be safe, it is advisable to consult online pharmacy review sites. User comments from these sites will determine the credibility and reliability of the pharmacy’s products and services. It is also important to confirm that the reviews are from actual individuals who have experienced making business with a specific online pharmacy.

Seniors at a Disadvantage When Purchasing Prescription Drugs Online

A recent national survey done by the Kaiser Family Foundation in association with Princeton Survey Research Associates (PSRA) discovered that the digital world is still divided when it comes to seniors purchasing prescription drugs online.

The study found that approximately 30 percent of seniors (in this article, we define seniors as aged 65 and older) have used the Internet. However, 70% of their younger, seemingly more Net-savvy counterparts (50-64 year olds) are surfing the Net.

The dramatic differences between the two groups indicate that the next generation of seniors will be more able to make more informed online prescription drug choices, and that online sources of pharmaceutical information may become more important as these 50-64 year olds age. Currently, only 21% of seniors have, at one point in time, viewed an Internet site for health information, whereas 53% of their 50-64 year old counterparts have done the same.

The survey also found a link between senior’s annual household income and their propensity to go online searching for health information: only 15% of seniors in the $20,000 a year or less income bracket have searched the Web, as opposed to 40% of the $20,000-49,000 income earners in the same age group, or 65% of the $50,000 and over bracket. Unfortunately, most of the $20,000 a year or less seniors are also on Medicare (64%).

Prescription drugs online have become, in the past several years, one of the top health care topics searched, with 13% of all seniors having researched pharmaceuticals at one time or another. Only 5% of seniors, however, say that they have researched drug costs online, with the same number stating they’ve purchased prescription drugs online.

With the new Medicare reforms that enable the use of discount drug cards, websites such as the federal Medicare.gov have become crucial comparison methods for seniors looking to save money. And yet, less than 1% of seniors’ doctors have recommended prescription drug websites to their clients, but more than half of the seniors participating in the survey have received emails from pharmaceutical companies that advertise medicines, nutritional therapies, supplements or other health related items.

Purchasing prescription drugs online shouldn’t be a hassle for seniors, and yet when looking at these statistics, it’s fairly evident the digital divide still exists; at it’s most disproportionate the tools created to help the most disadvantaged are not being used. Even though more than 30% of seniors have stated that the Internet is something they “wouldn’t want to do without”, and more than half feel the Internet keeps them in touch with loved ones, they are still not using the Internet to research prescription drugs online – or as much as they could be.

Hopefully, with this new research and increased awareness from those who support people over the age of 65, seniors can start researching, asking questions about and purchasing prescription drugs online with little to no hassle or headache.

Copyright © Stephen C. Dayton 2005